Yale Art Historian to Speak about Italian Painting

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass., April 19, 2013—Christopher Wood, professor of art history at Yale University, will speak on Thursday, April 25, at 5 p.m. at the Williams College Museum of Art. This lecture is titled “The Uninvited” and will focus on donor portraiture in fourteenth-century Italian painting. The event will take place in Lawrence Hall, room 231, on the Williams College campus. A conversation with Wood will follow. This lecture is free and open to the public.

Wood, who received his A.B. and his Ph.D. from Harvard University, has taught art history at Yale since 1992 and pursues wide-ranging research interests that include the northern and wider Renaissance, embedded portraiture, temporalities of art, and art historical method. He is the author of Anachronic Renaissance (Zone Books, 2010), which he co-wrote with Alexander Nagel, and Forgery, Replica, Fiction: Temporalities of German Renaissance Art (University of Chicago Press, 2008). He has been a senior fellow at the Internationales Forschungszentrum für Kulturwissenschaften in Vienna (2012), a member of the School of Historical Studies at Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study (2011-12), an Elena Maria Gorissen Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin (2004), a National Endowment for the Humanities/Rome Prize Fellow (2002-3), and a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow (2002).

This event is sponsored by the Department of Art Class of 1960s Scholars Program, a committee of art majors that invites guest speakers to campus.

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